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Monday, September 23, 2013

Crimini mushrooms



Crimini is the industry name for a baby portabella mushroom.

We enjoy the crimini mushrooms a lot; their slightly more mature state means that they have a browner color, firmer texture, and better flavor than the younger white mushrooms. We use them frequently in stews and soups, since we find that they hold up better in liquid.


How to Use

  • Because of their low moisture content, crimini mushrooms are great for sautéing.
  • It’s okay to rinse criminis before cooking; just don’t soak them in water. Or, if you prefer, simply wipe them clean with a damp paper towel.
  • Using an egg slicer is a convenient way to slice crimini mushrooms. After cleaning the mushrooms, simply orient them in the egg slicer so the blades will slice the mushroom vertically. Use the slicer the way you would to slice an egg, and you should end up with nice, even slices of mushroom.

How to Store

Keep crimini mushrooms unwashed in a paper bag in the fridge; avoid wrapping in plastic.

Did you know that most of the table mushrooms we eat are all of the same variety? Its name is Agaricus bisporus, according to Wikipedia, and it includes portobello, cremini, and white button mushrooms.
• The difference between these popular varieties of mushrooms is just age. The white button mushrooms, those very familiar kitchen staples, are simply the youngest variety. They have been cultivated, too, for that white color and soft texture. In the wild these mushrooms are usually browner.
• The portobello is the most mature mushroom here; it's really just an overgrown white mushroom! They are left to grow for longer, until they have spread out into that delicious meaty cap.
• The cremini mushroom, then, is just in between these two varieties. It's a moderately mature version of the white button mushroom, which is why it has a similar flavor. It's younger than the portobello, but still related, which is why these are sometimes sold as "baby bella" or "baby portobello" mushrooms.
Botanically, there is not a difference between portabello and crimini mushrooms‚ and baby bella is just another name for criminis. But in the marketplace, you'll see a difference. Mushrooms sold as portabellos are larger, and the gills are exposed and dark, because the mushroom is allowed to ripen after being picked. Criminis are smaller, and their gills are covered with a "veil" of mushroom skin. In fact, if the gills are not covered, the crimini is not as fresh as it should be.
Both criminis and portabellos are more intensely flavored than their more widely used cousin, the white button mushroom.

Nutritional Facts
Four to five crimini mushrooms is about 23 calories. They are an excellent source for:


  • Antioxidant selenium
  • B vitamin riboflavin
  • Copper
  • Potassium
  • Phosphorus
  • B vitamins niacin
  • Pantothenic acid
Minerals
Amounts Per Selected Serving
%DV
Calcium
3.6
mg
0%
Iron
0.1
mg
0%
Magnesium
1.8
mg
0%
Phosphorus
24.0
mg
2%
Potassium
89.6
mg
3%
Sodium
1.2
mg
0%
Zinc
0.2
mg
1%
Copper
0.1
mg
5%
Manganese
0.0
mg
1%
Selenium
5.2
mcg
7%




Read More http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2486/2#ixzz2fjD7wP3B

Nutrients in
Mushrooms - Crimini
1 cup (87 grams)
Nutrient%Daily Value

 selenium32.3%

 vitamin B225.2%

 copper21.5%

 vitamin B316.5%

 vitamin B513%

 potassium11.1%

 phosphorus10.4%

 zinc6.4%

 manganese6%

 vitamin B15.3%

 choline4.5%

 protein4.3%

 folate3%

Calories (19)                       1%



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